The World Health Organisation Report Estimates That Over 60% Of Coronary Heart Disease In Developed Countries Is Due To Blood Cholesterol Levels In Excess Of The Optimal 3.8 MMOL/L = 150 MG/DL = 1.5 G/L.*

“l’M NOT AT RISK OF HIGH CHOLESTEROL … AM I?” 🧐

While it’s true that people who are older, or overweight would be more likely to have high cholesterol, it can affect us all, regardless of weight or age. Even if you’re young and reasonably healthy, lifestyle factors can play a part in raising your cholesterol (sometimes to dangerous levels) and affecting its quality without you even knowing it. These include smoking, drinking alcohol, an unhealthy diet (too much trans/saturated fat), not being active and a family history of heart disease.

There are no clear symptoms of high cholesterol, so a visit to your GP is the only way to know for sure. However, simply taking a look at your lifestyle can provide an indication. Can you relate to any of the situations below? They are all at risk of developing high blood cholesterol, and should consider taking steps to reduce it…

“I do smoke but I’m an active 30 year old woman who eats well – I didn’t realise I could still possibly have high cholesterol…”

 “I admit I’m overweight but not obese, and there is no history of heart disease or high cholesterol in my family. Could I be at risk?”

“My father had high cholesterol but I eat well, get regular exercise and am still under 40 years old, so I’m not worried about cholesterol yet.”

“I don’t exercise often and don’t give too much thought to nutrition, but I’m not overweight so I don’t think my cholesterol is a problem.”

“WHAT IS CHOLESTEROL?”

Most people know that high cholesterol can be dangerous for your health, but do you actually know what it is? This natural fatty substance is made in the body by the liver and also found in foods such as meat, dairy and eggs. It might surprise you to know that it’s not all bad!

Cholesterol plays a vital role in the formation of cells and production of vitamin D, hormones and bile for digestion. However, high blood cholesterol, can lead to an increased risk of a heart attack, stroke and developing arthro atherosclerosis and other circulatory diseases, which is why it’s so important to keep your levels controlled.

THERE ARE 2 TYPES:

HDL (High Density Lipoprotein) or “good cholesterol” removes excess cholesterol (via the liver) from the blood, to prevent it clogging up your arteries.

LDL (Low Density Lipoprotein) or “bad cholesterol” is the more harmful type which carries cholesterol from the liver to cells of the body. If there’s too much LDL, it can build up in the walls of the blood vessels; causing them to narrow (atherosclerosis).

“HOW CAN I REDUCE (OR MAINTAIN) MY CHOLESTEROL LEVELS?”

  1. CLEAN UP…your Diet                                                                          Cleaning up your diet is the first thing to do. Reduce your intake of trans and saturated fats with simple food swap such as white bread for wholegrain, processed red meat for oily fish and lean poultry, and opting for nuts or seeds over ready-to-eat snacks like crisps.
  2. STEP UP… the Exercise                                                                           Being active helps to increase the “good” cholesterol (HDL) in your blood as it    stimulates the movement of fatty deposits to the liver; which helps to keep the heart and blood vessels in good condition. 150 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise per week is all you need** – try 30 minutes, 5 days per week!
  3. GIVE UP… smoking                                                                                      As well as other negative health effects, smoking increases your risk of developing cardiovascular disease. Cigarettes contain a chemical that prevents “good” HDL cholesterol from moving fatty deposits to the liver. This can mean increased cholesterol, narrowed arteries (atherosclerosis) and increased risk of heart attack and stroke.

LOWER YOUR CHOLESTEROL

Whatever your age, lifestyle factors can play a big part in raising your cholesterol, so take control of your health with a balanced nutrition and exercise plan.

Beta heart contains the key ingredient OatWell oat beta-glucan – shown to lower or maintain blood cholesterol***

Click Here To Order

Mix 2 scoops of Beta heart with water for sugar free drink.

You can also mix with fruit juice or add it to your favourite Formula 1 Healthy Meal shake once per day.

Alternatively mix 1 scoop twice per day.

  • 3 g of oat beta-glucans help to lower cholesterol*** (2 scoops)
  •  1.5 g of oat beta-glucans help to maintain cholesterol**** (1 scoop)
  • Sugar free
  • With no artificial sweeteners
  • High in fibre (3 g per scoop)
  • Source of protein.
  • 25 kcal per scoop

HOW TO ENJOY – BETA HEART!

The delicious vanilla-flavoured Beta heart powder was created to help you lower and maintain your cholesterol*****, but that doesn’t mean it shouldn’t be a treat for the taste buds too! Read on to discover the different ways to enjoy this fantastic product…

  • REFRESHING WITH WATER                                                                        For a delicious and refreshing vanilla-flavoured drink, mix 2 scoops of Beta heart with water once per day or 1 scoop with water twice per day!
  • GREAT WITH JUICE                                                                                 Want something a bit more fruity? Try adding 2 scoops to a glass of juice! Alternatively, enjoy 1 scoop of Beta heart mixed with juice twice per day.
  • PERFECT WITH SHAKE                                                                            When whipping up a Formula 1 Healthy Meal Shake, why not add 2 scoops of Beta heart? You’ll get around 272 kcals, 20g protein, 8.5g fibre and 3g of oat beta-glucans! Having 2 shakes per day? Add 1 scoop of Beta heart per shake!

THE BENEFICIAL EFFECT IS OBTAINED WITH A DAILY INTAKE OF 3G OAT BETA-GLUCANS.

*World Health Organisation (2002) The World Health Report 2002. Reducing Risks, Promoting Healthy Life. World Health Organisation: Geneva.

**World Health Organisation. Global status report on non-communicable diseases 2014.

***Oat beta-glucan has been shown to lower/reduce blood cholesterol. High cholesterol is a risk factor in the development of coronary heart disease. Beta-glucans contribute to the maintenance of normal blood cholesterol levels. The beneficial effect is obtained with a daily intake of 3g of oat beta-glucan. Coronary heart disease has multiple risk factors and altering one of these risk factors may or may not have a beneficial effect.

****Oat beta-glucans contribute to the maintenance of normal blood cholesterol levels. The claim may be used only for food which contains at least 1 g of beta-glucans from oats, oat bran, barley bran, or from mixtures of these sources per quantified portion. In order to bear the claim information shall be given to the consumer that the beneficial effect is obtained with adaily intake of 3 g of beta-glucans from oats, oat bran, barley, barley bran, or from mixtures of these beta-glucans.

*****Oat beta-glucan has been shown to lower/reduce blood cholesterol. High cholesterol is a risk factor in the development of coronary heart disease. Beta-glucans contribute to the maintenance of normal blood cholesterol levels. Coronary heart disease has multiple risk factors and altering one of these risk factors may or may not have a beneficial effect.

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